Leukemia Statistics

Leukemia affects people of all ages and ethnicities. Certain leukemia subtypes are more common in children, while others are more common in adults. More detailed leukemia statistics by age and subtype, including leukemia survival rates, are included below.

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia statistics

About 60% of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) occurs in children. Other key things to know about ALL:

  • It is most common before age 15 and after 50.
  • About 90% of children who receive treatment are cured (remission for 10 years).
  • As of 2017 (most recent available), the five-year survival rate for acute lymphoblastic leukemia is 70%.1
acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children survival rates

View our ALL webpage for more disease-specific information, including symptoms, diagnosis, treatment options, and more.

Acute myeloid leukemia statistics

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a rare blood cancer, accounting for 1% of all new cancer cases.

Other key things to know about AML:

  • The median age at diagnosis is 68.
  • Relapse (return of cancer after remission) affects 50% of people with AML.
  • As of 2017 (most recent available), the five-year survival rate for acute myeloid leukemia is 30%.1
acute myeloid leukemia survival rate over time

View our AML webpage for more disease-specific information, including symptoms, diagnosis, treatment options, and more.

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia statistics

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common form of leukemia in adults over the age of 19.

Other key things to know about CLL:

  • One in four new leukemia cases are CLL.
  • The median age at diagnosis is 70.
  • As of 2017 (most recent available), the five-year survival rate for CLL is around 87%.1
chronic lymphocytic leukemia survival rate

View our CLL webpage for additional information, including symptoms, diagnosis, treatment options, and more.

Chronic myeloid leukemia statistics

Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) represents about 15% of all leukemia in adults.

Other key things about CML:

  • The median age at diagnosis is 65.
  • Cases of CML are extremely rare in children.
  • As of 2017 (most recent available), the five-year survival rate for CML is about 71%.1
chronic myeloid leukemia survival rate

View our CML webpage for additional information, including symptoms, diagnosis, treatment options, and more.

Source: All statistics are extracted from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program.

Relative survival is an estimate of the percentage of patients who would be expected to survive the effects of their cancer. It excludes the risk of dying from other causes. Because survival statistics are based on large groups of people, they cannot be used to predict exactly what will happen to an individual patient. No two patients are entirely alike, and treatment and responses to treatment can vary greatly.

Other Blood Cancer Facts and Statistics

Lymphoma

  • This year alone, more than 90,390 people are expected to be diagnosed with non-Hodgkin or Hodgkin lymphoma.
  • More than 962,304 people are living with lymphoma.
  • Every day, 247 Americans are diagnosed with lymphoma.
  • Non-Hodgkin lymphoma is the seventh most common cancer in the United States.

Myeloma

  • An estimated 149,956 people are living with myeloma in the United States.
  • 34,920 people are expected to be diagnosed with myeloma this year.

Newly diagnosed?

Access information on finding a treatment provider, coping, preparing for your first appointment, and getting a second opinion.